Our Tumble Dryer is Dead – how we tackled the laundry?

Our family of 5 generate a lot of laundry. The washing machine needs to run at least once a day for me to be on top of the laundry game, and if I slack off or – like in this case, when the tumble dryer is out of the equation – the result is an enormous laundry pile.

It is autumn. In England. Even in “sunny Bournemouth” it does rain in autumn, so I couldn’t use our otdoor airer. I have an airer inside, but with the air circulation not being on the highest standards (in the old place), it takes up to two days for everything hanging to be dry.

Even with the most simplest maths, you can see how coming up to the moving day we were already facing shortages of fresh clothes and were avoiding the Mount Laundrest that was by our washing machine.

After we moved and Dan got the washing machine hooked on again,

the washing was singing its songs again with no problems at all. Without having a dryer or outdoor airer (and sunny days to go with it), we were hanging clothes on the radiators and the single airer we had. It didn’t take me long when I googled “launderettes near me”.

I found this little laundromat in Bear Cross that promised tidy space, tables and chairs to sit down on while waiting for your laundry and helpful staff. I was happy with that, so loaded with coins and three massive laundry baskets and a humongous bag full of dirty clothes and linen I found myself in the tidiest launderette I have ever seen. And I’ve seen many during my backpacking years!

The lady was helpful and lucky for me as a typical Finnish, she didn’t overindulge in small talk. She made me a cup of coffee and was happy to chat when I offered it, but she was as comfortable as I was to be sitting together in silence, minding our own business.

Business I did bring.

Three small and two big washing machines are dutifully washing my dirty textiles.

I had brought my laptop with me and hoped to do some blogging while the laundry was whirring away in the machines, but I was sooner ready than I expected. I had anticipated to spend a whole afternoon cramped up in a launderette, but all that laundry, including two duvets, took about two hours only to be washed and dried!

The lady of the house helped me fold the freshly washed laundry away which I was grateful about. Other times she busied herself cleaning the already pristine clean launderette when there was nothing else to do. For this I had no worries placing some of my damp clothes on the floor while sorting through them, the place was that clean! Considering I had just paid for them to be washed, mind you – it was not an inattentive act of mine.

At the time of visiting the pricing was as follows:

  • The big wash was £8, small £4.
  • Dryers: 50p for 5 minutes, £1 for 10 minutes.

You can use your own washing powder, though you can buy some there too separately.

launderette in bournemouth, laundry on a table

As we still do not have a dryer,

it may just be that I need to nip to the launderette again. I have been doing the washing every day, so I am on it – but if I need to, I don’t mind going back to the Bear Cross Launderette again. I would even recommend it to a friend and you, who reads this blog post. If you need to wash your duvets or have a similar Mount Launderest at your home like I did, it could be worth spending couple quids at this launderette to get it sorted.

The launderette I went to can be found in  

54 Anchor Rd, Bournemouth BH11 9HS
Open every day from 7:30am – 8:00pm
tel. : 01202 571344

This is not a paid collaborative blog post – if it was, it would have been mentioned at the very beginning of this blog post.

We are on Twitter now too – and still can be found on Instagram and Facebook.

We completed the Kids Kilometre

It so closely didn’t happen for us. The plan had been for Melody to run with me and Elisa to be pushed by Dan. On the day Melody woke up feeling poorly and ended up being sick, so she was out of the game.

Elisa wasn’t though.

Once I gathered my wits, I pushed her out of the house and onto a bus. I was determined to make it special mummy-daughter time then with Elisa.

I met up with the others close to the starting point and got our T-shirts on. There were a bunch of us running for the Dorset Children’s foundation – a varied group of kids with different difficulties and mobility issues. For many of them, you couldn’t see the struggles they have gone through to be there today, ready to run for the charity that gives so much back to them.

Me and Elisa, all ready for action!

I didn’t know what to expect really – I had never done anything like this before. I didn’t have time to feel self-conscious though as my amazing daughter kept me present in the moment. She was so excited about the attention she got from our friends and people walking past: she was so happy to be out and about and meeting people. She kept me grounded, I didn’t even have time to feel nervous.

Then they started the countdown

It was time to go. First we were surrounded by people and I was conscious not to push into people with Elisa’s chair. Soon the faster runners had got distance to us and we had more space around us. I picked up speed – for Elisa’s delight.

Elisa turned out to be the best personal trainer ever. The faster I ran, the more she giggled.

Naturally I wanted to see her enjoying herself as much as possible, so I ended up pushing her faster and faster. I had her backpack on my back that had her emergency medications, syringes, hearing stuff and all the rest of it in it and on her wheelchair, I had her suction machine, saturation monitor, oxygen cylinder, feed pump and whatever else on.. Above all her wheelchair is not designed for such purpose as running. It is not the lightest or easiest to handle as you try to be agile and run, but those technicalities aside – I had fun. She had fun. I didn’t run the straight line with her but went for the uneven terrain where she would get the more exciting bumpy ride that I knew she would laugh at, and I curved the wheels like on a snakes path.

She loved it.

I got sweaty and red in a face quite quickly, but I had this silly grin plastered on my face that glowed from within. It came from seeing Elisa enjoying herself. It came from her laughter and excited posture. It came from the buzz around me, from all these kids running with their mums or dads, the audience cheering.

So many firsts…

She had been snickering and giggling the whole way, but all of a sudden she fell quiet. She had focused on the the crowd. I had pushed her near the audience and held her arm out, which resulted in her receiving a couple of high fives. It quieted her down.

As she has both hearing and visual impairment, touch has always been very important sense to her – not only we use tactile sign language called “Tassels” with her, but she gets so much comfort from cuddles and simple touches. So, to get high fives from strangers while being pushed in her wheelchair was another thrilling experience for her.

Then she heard the clapping.

She had her cochlear implants on during the whole race and when people were clapping for her, she closed her eyes and concentrated on it. Even though I could not properly see her face and all the emotions it was conveying while running, I saw concentration and awe.

Coming closer to the finish line

I was surprised to feel sad. Even though I had found it more tiring that I care to say to push her, I didn’t want this experience to end just yet. They announced Elisa’s name and how she was running for the Dorset Children’s Foundation when we crossed the finish line, and I was teary-eyed. I didn’t see anyone I knew immediately, but lovely event organisers took us to get our medals.

When she was handed the medal,

I found myself welling up with emotion. I managed to hold it in till she had got her “Finisher 2019” t-shirt and then a tear or two rolled down my cheek while I pretended to look for a way out with the wheelchair. I felt so proud of her. I know I was the one that did the sweating, but with everything we’ve gone through together, I had never imagined this moment – of her getting a medal for finishing a race in a marathon event.

Such an absurd idea!

When she was in NICU and we feared she might be brain-dead or when she almost died because of a nasty chest infection when she was 3 and was in medically induced coma in paediatric intensive care unit in Southampton… or even just 2 years ago when our daily routine of medications and feeds took 24/7 in a way that we had no rest at all, before we had sufficient support in place.. If then someone would have told me that in just few years she would be handed a medal for finishing a race in Bournemouth marathon event… I am not sure what I would have thought.

When we’ve only been concentrating on surviving for so long, doing something extra curriculum like this is so out of the hat crazy that it is hard to wrap my thoughts and feelings around it.

3-year-old Elisa fighting for her life in PICU in Southampton, only 3 years ago now.
But look at us now!

After I had found the others and exchanged couple of emotional words, I found refuge at a cafe in Lower Gardens. Once I had given Elisa her midday medications and put her lunch running through the gastrostomy tube, I just hugged her and cried. I cried of joy, pride and for the amazing experience we just had. I cannot even explain fully why I was crying. I was just so freaking emotional.

Want to see the DCF group run on a video?

Alex, who supports the DCF’s work, ran with our group of kids taking video and photos of us. Elisa loved him and posed for him every time he came close with his camera, and all the footage show the atmosphere – she was so happy to be there. By the beach, breathing in the salty sea air, feeling the wind and making Mum run. Most of the photos of us by the beach are from him!

This is his video:

Not to forget,

All the children that took part in our group “challenge” really overdid themselves and had fun. With that, through our donation page we’ve raised a staggering 1 622 pounds with Gift Aid! How amazing is that?

That all will go to Dorset Children’s Foundation “Accessible for All” initiative. Read more about it here.

Elisa with Patsy, the co-founder of the Dorset Children’s Foundation (DCF).

I am not sure how much longer the donation page will be open for donations, but last time I checked, it still was. If you want to donate a pound or two after reading our experience, I would be so honoured if you did so in here: Kids Kilometre. It all goes for very good cause; it gives families like us opportunities to play together, to make family memories. Thanks to the Dorset Children’s Foundation Accessible for All initiative, that this money is raised for. The DCF does other important work too, check it all out from their website here.

Thank you – I’m just off to dry my tears away. Again.

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My Trusted Temper Tantrum Tamers

The stomping foot, arms crossed, protesting lower lip. The crying and screaming, the trembling body. The lovely classic signs of a temper tantrum.

There are times when I find it extremely hilarious.

When we are not in a rush and we are not having a temper tantrum over wellies or sandals on a rainy day. On those situations the problem might be solved with a conspicuous

“I understand you, I hear you, I know you want the sandals but it’s raining outside and you don’t want your feet to get wet now, do you? No? I thought so, so let’s save the sandals for another day and we go and find your lovely Peppa Pig wellies now.”

If it only worked…

She does love her Peppa boots!

But then there are the most entertaining temper tantrums when the child herself forgets why they are stomping their foot. The very mood when anything you offer is thrown back at you with a solemn “no”.

Like the other night at bedtime.

We had just finished our routine of brush your teeth – bath – pyjamas – hair – and it was time to pick a book for bedtime story. All of a sudden I see my child protesting and trashing around on the bed.

“Do you want your teddy?”
“No!”
“Do you want your drink?”
“No!”
“Do you want the monkey book for bedtime story?”
“No!”
“The Gruffalo book?”
“No!”
“Do you want mummy hug?”
“No!”
“Daddy hug?”
“No!”
“Do you want a kiss?”
“No!”
“What would you like?”
“No!”
“What, you would like a ‘no’?”
“No!”
“Okay,” I inhale and shout as loud as I can master, knowing that Elisa’s night carer is just next door, “NO!!!!!
That startles her. She turns to stare at me.
“Is that what you wanted?” I asked.
“No…” She says and sniffs.
“What would you like then?”
“No.”
“Another one? Really?”
“No.”
“Okay then… NO!!!” I shout and slam my hands on the bed too, for the effect.
Melody can’t hide her smile.
“Right, would you like to pick a book now?”
“No.”
“What, no book?”
“No…”
“What would you like?”
Melody cracks another smile.
“No..?”
“Okay, last one…. You ready?”
“No..”
NO!!!” I shout.
She dissolves in laughter.

I gather my giggling child up in my arms and once she’s stopped laughing, I tell her we are going to lie down on the bed now. I knew that if she wanted a book at that point, she would tell me so – but I suspected the whole tantrum was caused by her being so tired. Without another protest, she settles down next to me.

“Mum?” Melody asks.
“Yes, Melody?”
“Cuddle me.”
I wrap my arms tighter around her.
“Melody?”
“Yes, Mummy?”
“Hug me.”
“Okay okay…” and she wraps her slender arms around my neck.
“Night night, Melody.”
“Night night, Mummy.”

Couple more minutes, and she was fast asleep. I disentangle myself free and just watch her sleep, before I tiptoe back downstairs.

There is another Tantrum Tamer that I’ve used

Instead of explaining it, I just show you the video where I got the idea from.

On a video, Dad is holding a little girl in his arms. The girl is crying. Dad tells her that it’s his turn now and starts to wail himself. The girl stops sobbing and stares at his father (through the screen). Father stops crying and tells the girl it’s her turn to cry now. The girls answers with “no”. Dad takes couple more turns on crying, but the girl is done and doesn’t want to cry anymore.

Melody responds with “NO!” first, then runs to cover my mouth when I “cry”. She’s by then stopped crying herself, so we can have a conversation about what went wrong, why we were upset. Occasionally the conversations go horribly wrong and I find myself witnessing another tantrum… but after a couple of turns with “crying”, we usually do end up fixing the situation for real.

How do I solve the wellies versus sandals issue?

I am not so proud of this one.

Too many times we disagree about the clothing and instead of getting ready to go, we squabble over summer hats or woolly hats, lost socks and sun lotions or if she can bring whatever unpractical toy with her.

There was a time when she didn’t believe I would leave to go to nursery without her.

We had been trying to get ready, but disagreed on I-cant-even-remember-on-what, and I had used all the reasoning power I had and the situation was not resolving. So like a mature adult that I am, I said

“Well, if you are not doing what I ask you to do, I’m going without you.” I paused to see if that made a difference.
It didn’t.
“Okay then, bye bye, I’ll see you later!” I got up to my feet, walked to the door, opened it, stepped outside and closed the door.
I heard the wailing scream immediately.
I counted to three and opened the door.
“Would you like to come with me?”
“Yes please,” she sobbed and ran to my arms.

I had no problems getting her dressed the way I needed her, and she was the laughing usual self already on our way to the car.

If I struggle with the same issues now,

all I need to say “Okay, I can go without you then, bye bye” when she then hastily says “No noooo!” and runs to do what I need her to do and off we go.

(Needless to say, this is the very last resort – it would loose it’s magic if I overdid it. Also, I do not want my child to live in a constant fear that I would actually leave her behind [never]).

To warn anyone who sees me and Melody at a supermarket..

I am definitely one of those parents who will throw a “temper tantrum” on a floor just to shut their kid up. If she can do it, so can I.

My little helper helping me in my hometown’s supermarket in Finland.

So far, she’s been too good while shopping. Such a little angel helping me carry my shopping basket, getting my products for me and doing every little bit to help me where she can. But one day.. One day I will find myself on a floor pretending to have a temper tantrum.

What are your trusted Temper Tantrum Tamers?

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