Mother at Home: Child at the Hospital.

So much of missing Elisa is guttural.

Usually, when I miss someone, I either call them or text them. Usually the latter. I can keep in touch with my stepdaughter and nieces that way, I can call my parents who live in Finland. I can even write and receive simple sentences from my 5-year-old or have a chat with her over the phone if a need arose.

With Elisa, none of the above communication methods are usable. She is non-verbal, and cerebral palsy makes it nearly impossible for her to master any sort of meaningful movement in any of her limbs or body. She is deaf, and when she is poorly, she hardly ever tolerates her cochlear implants as she prefers to heal in complete silence that her body naturally engulfs her in. Her eyesight is not a lot better, even though she can recognise people and animated characters by looking at them. Still, eyeing Elisa through a screen knowing that it is possible she might not even recognise me on the screen at her end does not provide the equal comfort than actually seeing her.

So much of communication with Elisa is done through touch. We cuddle her to shower her with love. I stroke her hair, I gently trace her facial features with tips of my fingers. I tickle her, or give her a firm, strong massage. I smell her hair, the curve of her upper lip, where I can feel her breath. I love breathing in the smell of her breath when she’s healthy. When there isn’t that sickly sense that she’s got a flu,.

I can’t get any of that through the screen.

When she is not at home, the house feels utterly empty. Even if everyone else was filling the space, the lack of Elisa’s presence is so immense that none of us really know what to do with ourselves. Even the cat and the dog look like they’ve lost the plot, wandering around aimlessly, looking for something. Looking for Elisa. Even if she doesn’t do much, she does so much more than any of us realise, and it only comes painstakingly clear when she is not around to do it.

What is the hospital life like during the pandemic as a parent at home, when your child is an inpatient?

I recorded this voice clip on the 2nd of March. I attempted to answer the simple question of: “What is the hospital life with your child like during the pandemic, when you are the parent at home?”

I made it into a little slide show, with subtitles.

There are many reasons why me and Dan have made these care arrangements; why he is the one looking after Elisa at the hospital while I’m at home with Melody. One of the reasons is as simple as me being the one with a driving licence, therefore doing the supply runs between home and hospital.

Today is 9th of March 2021.

Elisa is still in hospital. I got to go and have a cuddle with her this morning before she got transferred to Southampton hospital with her Dad.

During the pandemic, Elisa’s muscle tone has been getting worse. She suffers from dystonia, which is “unintentional sustained muscle contractions leading to abnormal postures.” The lack of physiotherapy and occupational therapy may have contributed towards the worsening muscle tone.

Two weeks ago Elisa got admitted to the hospital due a lot of stress from dystonia – she was in so much pain. We took her in for the third time this year.

While doing their examinations the hiatus hernia was discovered nearly by accident, and since then we have discovered her fundoplication has loosened up as well as her hips are not doing really that well either.

She will have a surgery tomorrow. They will tighten up her fundoplication and get rid of that hernia that is letting her bowels push her lungs. I can’t even imagine how painful that has been for her. I mean, I’ve seen how much in agony she’s been – but to actually know how she’s felt…

 I just hope she will recover quickly and come back to being her happy self, without pain, as soon as possible. I am also so very scared. It’s going to be a major surgery.

Today is 12th of March 2021.

The surgery lasted 8 hours, but was regarded a success. Afterwards she was on a ventilator for nearly 24 hours in Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU), but has already been taken off the ventilator and moved to High Dependency Unit (HDU) . I wish we could go up there with Melody to visit, but it’s not possible nor safe. Melody has been back at school, so even if the hospital would allow siblings to visit, we would not recognise it being safe.

Finally,

It is strange being home without Elisa and Dan. I’m trying to keep Melody as busy as possible, as this time around she has found it very tough indeed. She was so used to us shielding, all of us being constantly at home together, and all of a sudden half of her family is out of reach and mostly to be communicated with through screens.

We do not know how long Elisa will be in the hospitals for this time. She won’t only need to recover from the surgery, but most of her medications need to be fiddled with again to provide the relief from dystonia and other problematic by-products of her disabilities.

Will keep you posted…